US Navy donates equipment to strengthen mosquito survelliance

US Navy donates equipment to strengthen mosquito survelliance

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The Ministry of Health and Medical Services has received 10 microscopes and surveillance equipment from the US Navy to assist health staff prevent emerging preventable diseases

This equipment will be used to monitor the density and distribution of mosquitoes in the divisions and subsequently facilitate control interventions against vector-borne diseases.

Mosquito-borne diseases place a burden on health facilities, health supplies and the workforce as well as having an adverse impact on Fiji’s economy, tourism and community stability.

Mr Usamate acknowledged the US Navy for this timely donation and said that this will enable the health authorities to work more efficiently in identifying cases of mosquito-borne diseases.

“We are extremely blessed with the donations and with the technical experts who had been mentoring our team and Vector Surveillance and Control capacity development program”.

Mr Usamate added that prevailing trends suggests that cases of dengue are likely to rise, therefore urgent action is needed now for its prevention and control.

Health Minister opens medical conference

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The Minister for Health and Medical Services Mr Jone Usamate officially opened the 58th Fiji Medical Association conference last week, as medical officers from around the country gathered together to discuss concerns raised on disaster management and patient care.

At the height of disasters, the Health Ministry works behind the scenes to provide essential quality health care, and it was an opportune time to meet and discuss with the medical professionals how to address such situations before the next cyclone season begins.

Mr Usamate reminded the doctors on their roles as strong and effective leaders to implement strategic developments in the delivery of healthcare services.

“Strong leadership is vital for any development and I urge you to uphold the vision and the values of the ministry and be a role model to your subordinates, and continue to serve the people who look to you for medical assistance”, Mr Usamate said.

Approximately 150 doctors from around the country attended the conference and deliberated on improving and strengthening the medical services mainly focused on disasters.

Health Minister opens medical conference

The Minister for Health and Medical Services Mr Jone Usamate officially opened the 58th Fiji Medical Association conference last week, as medical officers from around the country gathered together to discuss concerns raised on disaster management and patient care.

At the height of disasters, the Health Ministry works behind the scenes to provide essential quality health care, and it was an opportune time to meet and discuss with the medical professionals how to address such situations before the next cyclone season begins.

Mr Usamate reminded the doctors on their roles as strong and effective leaders to implement strategic developments in the delivery of healthcare services.

“Strong leadership is vital for any development and I urge you to uphold the vision and the values of the ministry and be a role model to your subordinates, and continue to serve the people who look to you for medical assistance”, Mr Usamate said.

Approximately 150 doctors from around the country attended the conference and deliberated on improving and strengthening the medical services mainly focused on disasters.

Local testing for Mosquito viruses.

Local testing for Mosquito viruses.

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Plans are underway for testing Zika virus locally as medical laboratory staff undergo extensive training at the centre for Communicable Centre for Disease Control (CCDC) in Tamavua.

This was revealed to the Minister for Health and Medical Services Mr Jone Usamate as he met the trainees during his visit to the centre at Mataika house.

Endemic to the Pacific, mosquito-borne diseases such as dengue fever remain a threat to Fiji, especially with the emergence of new diseases such as Chikungunya and Zika.

In order to improve the management of such diseases, three CCDC laboratory staff are currently undergoing extensive training in conducting PCR testing for the three most common mosquito-borne diseases such as dengue, chikungunya and zika, under the guidance of a senior scientist from the Queensland University of Technology in Australia.

Mr Usamate thanked Ms Debbie Phillips for providing the much-needed training to local staff which will enhance the capacity of the staff and reduce testing costs.

“On behalf of the Ministry I thank you for your efforts in training the staff and I am optimistic that we will be able to continue the work in a effective and efficient manner to assist our people”, he said.